Steve Bate opioid crisis

Steve Bate of Community Cannabis Center addresses the opioid crisis by speaking with local communities in Florida.

Since 1999, deaths attributed to opioid crisis have tripled to more than 115 deaths daily. 2017 demonstrated a 10% increase of opioid related deaths since 2016, an approximate total of 77,000. To put this number in perspective, more people died from fatal overdoses in America during 2016 than the Vietnam War in total. Steve Bate and Dr. Mitchell Davis from the Community Cannabis Center have researched the epidemic and brought to light the role cannabis could play in curbing these startling statistics.

Steve Bate noted during the City of Miami GESE Retirement Trust Seminar on 17 August 2018 how the state of Florida has a statistically higher death toll than the United States average rate as a whole.

Steve Bate established how the opioid epidemic has grown so rapidly. He surmised the introduction of OxyContin by Purdue Pharma in 1996, which is now impacted by dozens of lawsuits issued by various states regarding deceptive marketing practices, played a leading part in this crisis. The drug was prescribed to relieve moderate to severe pain symptoms similar to those for which patients would take a drug like Percocet. OxyContin is an opioid medication which was believed to be grossly over-prescribed.

Though there is increased awareness of the dangers of opioid usage, the relative death count continues to climb; Steve Bate expressed the need to address the epidemic directly to change the face of the community in Florida.

The research Steve Bate brought to the presentation revealed work related stress and poor work environments perpetuate substance abuse to soothe mental health symptoms and physical injuries. If employment concerns of this nature perpetuate, a better recourse for addressing the symptoms of these life circumstances is crucial.

The current medications used to help wean those with an opioid addiction are problematic. Various issues are not addressed by counterdrugs such as those containing methadone, buprenorphine, naltrexone, etc. In many cases, intense cravings continue and the relapse rate back to opioid use remains high. Steve Bate’s presentation further illustrated the sensitivity to opioids and risk of overdose increases with the use of drugs containing naltrexone.

Steve Bate’s presentation accompanied by Dr. Mitchell Davis’ speech at theBoca Raton Volen Center on 20 August 2018 made the case for the role cannabis plays in addressing the opioid crisis.

Steve Bate and Dr. Mitchell Davis teach their local communities at the Community Cannabis Center about the health benefits of cannabis use. Regarding the opioid crisis, cannabis has demonstrated a more manageable and potent impact on pain symptoms. Dr. Mitchell Davis emphasizes how CBD works on the human body’s natural “endocannabinoid” system. Cannabinoids act as the key to unlock the body’s natural ability to regulate several functions including soothing pain, sleeping, appetite, mood, immunity, etc.

The move for legalization of medicinal marijuana nationwide would put to the test the capacity for cannabis treatment to address the opioid crisis.

Contact the Community Cannabis Center in Delray Beach, Florida to learn more about medical marijuana referrals and how the Florida Compassionate Use Act affects you.

Interested members of the community who want to know more about how cannabis could help improve their health are able to make an appointment online at https://communitycannabiscenter.com/#contact-and-location. The CCC is located at 5341 West Atlantic Ave, Ste. 306, Delray Beach, FL 33484. Call (561) 270-4040 or send an e-mail to [email protected]  for more information.